Surveys

Advice and Assistance TSCM Service:

Vector Technologies, LLC offers a pro-active TSCM service to identify and resolve any possible technical vulnerabilities or threats that a client organization may encounter. These types of pro-active TSCM services can be highly beneficial to any organization that operates an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area. These services are invaluable because an organization can reduce the cost for construction of their facilities and reduce the cost of procurement of associated organizational equipment by employing several pro-active technical security measures and procedures.

Countermeasures Equipment Advice and Assistance:

A continuous TSCM service provided to client organizations to identify, aide in the selection of and aide in the conduct of scientific validation testing of countermeasures devices, equipment or materiel. This TSCM service should normally be provided as part of a Pre-Construction Advice and Assistance TSCM service. However, this type of TSCM service can and should be provided after even after an area or conveyance has been designated as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area. Given the fact that technological advances are made on a daily basis, it is safe to assume that technical surveillance technologies are no different. As such, technical surveillance countermeasures devices, equipment and materiel have limited effective lifespans. What worked yesterday might not work today. And what works today might not work tomorrow. Therefore, an effective TSCM Program will continuously identify both threat technologies and countermeasures/security technologies. This knowledge must be pro-actively shared with supported organizations or clients in order to protect classified, sensitive or private information. Given the variety of TSCM services available, this is one of the most important TSCM service for supported organizations or clients. Unfortunately however, it is one of the least used TSCM services. Organizations that ignore this service ignore it at their own peril.

Pre-Construction Advice and Assistance:

A service conducted prior to construction of SCIF, SAPF, or during renovation of an existing sensitive area, to ensure that appropriate physical and technical security countermeasures are included in the planning and construction. Areas or conveyances to be accredited as SCIFs, SAPFs or Secure Facilities must meet applicable published physical and technical security specifications. However, experience has shown that few SCIFs, SAPFs or Secure Facilities are actually constructed in accordance with published specifications. As such, pre-construction advice and assistance TSCM services for these areas are highly recommended because the typical shortcomings and failures to the published specifications can be discussed and reviewed with the supported organizations’ security officers and contracted construction companies. In addition, this service also includes a countermeasures equipment advice and assistance TSCM service to identify the most appropriate and effective countermeasures devices, equipment and materiel to be incorporated into the design and construction of Accredited Facilities and Private Secure Areas. When conducted with a pre-accreditation TSCM inspection, a pre-construction advice and assistance TSCM service is one of the most valuable TSCM services available. If used in conjunction, these services can save an organization considerable expense and prevent costly delays. Not only will the organization be guaranteed that their new facility will be accredited, but any possible security threat will also be identified for resolution during the pre-construction and construction phases.

Technical Security Evaluation (TSE):

A non-instrumented evaluation of all factors related to potential vulnerabilities of technical penetration of a facility, system, network, product, or equipment. Typical considerations include security against acoustical, optical, audio frequency, radio frequency, and other methods of penetration as well as adequacy of electronic protection. A TSE includes TSCM and TEMPEST considerations.

Technical Security Survey (TSS):

A combination of a full TSCM survey and an instrumented TEMPEST Countermeasures Review of an area or conveyance where classified, sensitive or private information is, (or will be), discussed, viewed, stored or processed. Typically a TSS will only be conducted for those areas or conveyances that employ appropriate scientifically validated Physical Security Measures to guard against unauthorized disclosure of classified, sensitive or private information.

TEMPEST Countermeasures Review (TCR):

A thorough, physical, instrumented and visual examination of an area or conveyance to determine the applicable TEMPEST countermeasures. Electronic and electromechanical telecommunications and automated information processing equipment can produce unintentional information-bearing energy also known as Compromising Emanations (CE). As such, the field of TEMPEST has been established for the investigation, study and control of CE. And TEMPEST countermeasures are those measures or methods applied to a system or facility in order to achieve TEMPEST security or the control of CE. For example, TEMPEST countermeasures include RED/BLACK Installation Guidance, TEMPEST Zoning, TEMPEST Suppressed Equipment (TEMPEST Typed Equipment) and radio frequency (RF) shielding. Since TEMPEST countermeasures can be very costly, TEMPEST countermeasures are usually only implemented when deemed necessary by a Certified TEMPEST Technical Authority (CTTA). And in order to determine which, if any, TEMPEST countermeasures to employ for an area or conveyance, a CTTA will either conduct or validate a TEMPEST Countermeasures Review. Once a TCR is completed, and if the CTTA deems it necessary to employ TEMPEST countermeasures in order to protect classified and/or sensitive information from CE exploitation, the CTTA will determine and produce a written report with recommendations for the most cost-effective countermeasures. The organization that controls the area or conveyance will then be responsible for funding and implementing the TEMPEST countermeasures. If the organization chooses to move forward then the CTTA must determine whether or not the countermeasures were effectively implemented and produce a corresponding written report. If the organization chooses not to move forward with the countermeasures, the organization must then accept the risk of compromise in writing.

TSCM Survey:

A comprehensive TSCM examination of an area or conveyance to detect technical surveillance devices, technical hazards, and physical and technical security vulnerabilities. For a TSCM service to be considered a full TSCM survey the following stipulations must all be met:

1. The TSCM survey will consist of a thorough physical, visual, and fully instrumented electronic examination.
2. The entire area or conveyance will be surveyed.
3. The area or conveyance must be completely furnished, fully equipped and fully built.
4. The area or conveyance must be fully operational or fully capable of normal operations.

TSCM surveys are normally conducted for any area or conveyance where classified, sensitive or private information is, (or will be), discussed, viewed, stored or processed – i.e. areas such as Accredited Facilities and Private Secure Areas. These Accredited Facilities and/or Private Secure Areas may be permanent, semi-permanent or temporary in nature. As with any Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area, it is expected that these areas/conveyances will employ and maintain appropriate scientifically validated Physical Security Measures to guard against unauthorized disclosure of classified, sensitive or private information. Failure to employ and maintain appropriate physical security measures for these areas will negate the need to conduct a TSCM survey in first place or negate the results of a completed TSCM survey.

Conference TSCM Survey:

A TSCM survey conducted prior, during and after a conference, meeting or briefing where classified, sensitive or private information is being discussed and/or presented. This type of TSCM survey is conducted when an especially sensitive conference takes place in an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area and the nature of conference or meeting warrants especially stringent technical security measures. Often this service is requested on short notice or when physical access to the conference location is limited prior and/or after the conference. In such instances, the TSCM service becomes a TSCM limited-scope survey because a thorough and comprehensive physical, electronic, and visual examination cannot be conducted. Therefore, in order to provide the utmost technical security for a conference or meeting, proper advanced planning and arrangements must be made so that a full TSCM survey can be conducted. As stated previously, a properly executed and full conference TSCM survey will consist of a TSCM examination of the conference area prior, during and after the conference. That means that sufficient time will have to be allocated to the TSCM team for free and unfettered access to the conference area prior to the conference or meeting. A nearby location must also be identified where the TSCM team will conduct an IPMS/CEDAS TSCM service before, during and after the conference. (For more information what is done during the conference see a description of an IPMS/CEDAS TSCM service.) Following the end of the conference, unfettered physical access to the area will once again be required.

Another reason for this type of TSCM survey is when a conference takes place in an area that is not normally controlled as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area. In other words, the area is not normally subject to effective physical security measures. For more on this type of conference TSCM survey see the details of a TSCM survey for a conference held in a temporarily Accredited Facility or a temporary Private Secure Area.

Conveyance TSCM Survey:

A TSCM survey conducted on conveyances such as cars, SUVs, limousines, buses, trains, aircraft, and boats. As with an any area where classified, sensitive or private information is, (or will be), discussed, viewed, stored or processed this type of TSCM survey should be conducted prior to using the conveyance as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area. Of particular concern is the fact that conveyances are typically maintained by personnel other than the owners of the conveyances. There are physical security concerns, as well as Technical Security concerns for conveyances maintained by outside personnel. For example, relatively recent academic reports demonstrate that it is possible to hack critical components of modern vehicles. These attacks can easily take place when the conveyance is outside of the positive control of the owner. In addition, academic reports show that attacks can be carried out wirelessly by exploiting the conveyance’s built-in cellular and WiFi telecommunications equipment. Aside from the fact that it might be possible to cause the death of the conveyance occupants, telecommunications capabilities built into modern conveyances can easily be compromised by knowledgeable attackers to conduct technical surveillance attacks to listen to and/or record classified, sensitive or private conversations. As long as conveyances have operational and unsecure built-in telecommunications equipment there is very little benefit to conducting TSCM surveys on these conveyances. Instead, all conveyance built-in telecommunications equipment should be deactivated and removed. In addition, any conveyance that is to be used as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area must be maintained under constant physical security control by the owner or owning organization and the conveyance must not be maintained by maintenance personnel without being under constant escort by Technical Security Personnel.

For information on how to secure the telecommunications systems used in your conveyance please feel free to contact us and/or review the Vector Technically Secure Mobile Telecommunications System brochure and corresponding webpage.

Expeditionary TSCM Survey:

A TSCM survey conducted in an expeditionary area that was not originally controlled as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area. These areas typically present special challenges to expeditionary organizations (Military, Governmental and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and to their TSCM support elements. Some of the types of facilities that may be used by expeditionary organizations are as follows:

1. Mobile locations such as tents, mobile containers or conveyances
2. Semi-permanent buildings built for the expeditionary organization
3. Previously uncontrolled permanent buildings (usually controlled by a foreign government)
4. New buildings built especially for the expeditionary organization

Of all these locations, Accredited Facilities or Private Secure Areas located in previously uncontrolled permanent buildings are subject to the highest technical surveillance threat. There are several reasons that it is extremely unwise to conduct a classified, sensitive or private conference/meeting in a previously uncontrolled area. Modern technical surveillance attacks can be highly sophisticated and extremely difficult, if not impossible, to detect with even the most advanced TSCM equipment and techniques. And the technical surveillance threat is compounded by and increases dramatically in areas that have been previously uncontrolled, i.e. not subject to physical security controls. An adversary will typically have unfettered access and control of the target area (hotel, resort area or building formerly controlled by a foreign government) with the ability to install highly sophisticated devices into the physical structure of the area. For this reason, areas in previously uncontrolled permanent buildings should not be selected as locations for Accredited Facilities or Private Secure Areas.

However, should it be unavoidable and if a previously uncontrolled area is selected as the future site on an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area then a full range of TSCM services should be employed to include the following:

1. Pre-Construction Advice and Assistance
2. Countermeasures Equipment Advice and Assistance
3. Pre-Accreditation TSCM Inspection
4. Pre-Occupancy/Pre-Use Expeditionary TSCM Survey

In addition, personnel such as Cleared Construction Personnel (CCPs) and Construction Surveillance Technicians (CSTs) who are cleared at the Top Secret level, experienced in construction, and properly trained to ensure the security integrity of the facility under construction should be employed for expeditionary US government facilities and similar personnel should be employed by NGOs and private organizations. CCPs, CSTs and the corresponding construction security measures should be employed to ensure the utmost technical security of the expeditionary facility.

Nonetheless, it should be clear to client organizations that all of these TSCM services are much less effective for Accredited Facilities and Private Secure Areas located in previously uncontrolled areas and newly constructed areas where CSTs are not utilized. If at all possible, any new facility should be built by CCPs, under the watchful eyes of CSTs and from the ground up to house the Accredited Facilities and Private Secure Areas. Once built these areas should always be subject to the appropriate physical security controls.

For more information on the technical surveillance threat to classified, sensitive and private information when unescorted access is allowed to Accredited Facilities or Private Secure Areas see the following:

The Spy Game

http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-500164_162-155216.html

For more information on the serious and costly damage caused to the National Security when CCPs, CSTs and appropriate construction security measures are not used see any one of the following articles:

The Bugged Embassy Case: What Went Wrong

http://www.nytimes.com/1988/11/15/world/the-bugged-embassy-case-what-went-wrong.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

Bug-free U.S. Embassy building in Moscow opens for business

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2000-07-07/news/0007070212_1_embassy-building-american-embassy-new-embassy

Cleaning the Bug House

http://www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2012/September%202012/0912embassy.aspx

Pre-Occupancy/Pre-Use TSCM Survey:

A TSCM survey conducted prior to the occupancy of an area or use of a conveyance where classified, sensitive or private information is, (or will be), discussed, viewed, stored or processed. This type of TSCM survey is conducted after an area or conveyance has been approved as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area and has been furnished and equipped to be fully operational. Ideally a TEMPEST evaluation should also be conducted prior to occupancy or use. If at all possible, a TEMPEST Countermeasures Review should be conducted prior to occupancy of the Accredited Facility. (Note: Official TEMPEST Countermeasures Reviews are only conducted for government facilities and conveyances.) Ideally, this service along with the following TSCM services should be employed to ensure that the Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area will indeed function as a Technically Secure Facility:

1. Pre-Construction Advice and Assistance
2. Countermeasures Equipment Advice and Assistance
3. Pre-Accreditation TSCM Inspection

For those areas or conveyances where a higher level of technical security is warranted and desired an IPMS/CEDAS TSCM service and Conference TSCM survey is also possible.

Residence TSCM Survey:

A TSCM survey conducted at residences. As with an any area where classified, sensitive or private information is, (or will be), discussed, viewed, stored or processed this type of TSCM survey should be conducted prior to using a part of the residence as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area. Residential TSCM surveys present special challenges because of several factors:

1. Unescorted residential services such as cleaning services or maintenance services present a technical surveillance threat.
2. Family members that may have access to the area where classified, sensitive or private information is discussed, viewed or processed may present a security vulnerability.

While SCIFs and SAPFs have technical security requirements such as acoustic protection requirements, Secure Facilities do not. Worse yet, collateral classified information and materials may be authorized to be removed from normal Secure Facilities for work in residential environments. While regulations state that security measures appropriate for the level of classification must be in place to provide adequate protection and security-in-depth and to prevent access by unauthorized persons, the definition of “appropriate security measures” is left open to interpretation and not specifically. A rational, valid and technically secure approach would be to require that any residential “Secure Facility” meet the physical and technical security specifications for SCIFs and SAPFs.

For more information on the threat to residential Accredited Facilities and Private Secure Areas see:

Beware! Our friends are bugging us, embassies told
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/article1904602.ece

For all the reasons stated above, Vector recommends that any Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area within a residence be constructed/installed and validated as a Technically Secure Facility (TSF). Should your organization decide to employ the highest level of technical security possible for a residential Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area please feel free to contact us and/or review the Vector Portable RF Shielded Enclosure brochure and corresponding webpage.

Temporary Facility TSCM Survey:

A TSCM survey conducted in an area that is not normally controlled as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area but where such designations have nevertheless been temporarily authorized. In other words, the area has not previously been subject to effective physical security measures. Once the decision has been made to use an area for classified, sensitive or private operations, appropriate physical security controls are temporarily established for the duration of use of the area as an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area. Two common examples of temporary facilities are hotels and conference centers. In both cases a TSCM survey is conducted prior, during and after the use of these areas as temporary Accredited Facilities or Private Secure Areas. (This type of TSCM survey is very similar to a conference TSCM survey.) Clients should be aware that there are several reasons that it is extremely unwise to conduct a classified, sensitive or private conference/meeting in a previously uncontrolled area. For example, since these areas are normally uncontrolled it is relatively easy to install technical surveillance devices. In addition, if a technical surveillance device is found it will be extremely, if not impossible, to identify the perpetrator of the attack.

Nevertheless, classified, sensitive and private conferences/meetings are regrettably still held in once normally uncontrolled areas. While conducting a TSCM survey is an appropriate security measure in these instances, the effectiveness may be severely compromised. Again, modern technical surveillance attacks can be highly sophisticated and extremely difficult, if not impossible, to detect with even the most advanced TSCM equipment and techniques. And to make matters worse, the technical surveillance threat increases dramatically in areas that have been previously uncontrolled. An adversary will typically have unfettered access and control of the target area (hotel room or conference area) with the ability to install highly sophisticated devices into the physical structure of the area which will typically be undetectable and/or be extremely difficult to remove by TSCM professionals. Therefore, Vector Technologies recommends the use of a portable radio frequency (RF) shielded enclosure, in addition to other TSCM equipment and security procedures that will defeat even the most sophisticated technical surveillance attacks carried out against temporary Accredited Facilities and Private Secure Areas. For more information on how to secure your temporary facility please feel free to contact us and/or review the Vector Portable RF Shielded Enclosure brochure and webpage.

Limited-Scope TSCM Service:

Any TSCM service in which a full suite of TSCM equipment and all applicable TSCM techniques cannot or are not used. The reason that a full suite of TSCM equipment and applicable TSCM techniques are not used may be due to one or more extenuating circumstances. In such cases the TSCM team will note and explain the extenuating circumstances in the final written report provided to the client.

In Place Monitoring System (IPMS)/Continuous Energy Detection & Analysis System (CEDAS) TSCM Service:

A manual or automated TSCM service that concentrates on a continuous and thorough instrumented search and analysis of the electromagnetic and mechanical energy spectrum through a variety of sensors and technologies. An IPMS/CEDAS may consist of a permanently installed infrastructure or it may be semi-permanent in nature depending on the need and the funding of an organization. As with other types of TSCM services, IPMS/CEDAS services can be conducted for offices, conference rooms, residences, conveyances (such as cars, SUVs, limousines, buses, trains, aircraft, and boats), temporary Accredited Facilities or temporary Private Secure Areas (such as hotel rooms) and military expeditionary locations. In addition to the wide variety of locations where IPMS/CEDAS operations can be carried out, there are a wide variety of technical capabilities that an IPMS/CEDAS may possess. For example, the most rudimentary IPMS/CEDAS may consist of a single TSCM team with standard TSCM equipment that carries out an extended TSCM mission very similar to a conference TSCM survey. At the other end of the capability scale is an enterprise-wide (building or even campus-wide), automated, continuous and highly sophisticated IPMS/CEDAS.

TSCM Inspection:

A TSCM service that is very similar to, but falls short of, a complete TSCM survey for one or more of three reasons; (1) the TSCM inspection is narrowly focused on a particular physical part of an area or conveyance; (2) the TSCM inspection is narrowly focused on a particular item located within the area or conveyance such as electronic equipment, electronic systems, furniture, or gifts; and/or (3) the area or conveyance is not fully equipped, furnished or operational.

Acoustic Security Instrumented Inspection: A physical and instrumented inspection of an Accredited Facility or Private Secure Area, (whether the facility in its entirety or specific partitions), to determine the sound isolation or speech privacy of the facility’s physical structure. Accredited Facilities, such as Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities (SCIFs) and Special Access Program Facilities (SAPs) must be designed and constructed to specific acoustic security standards so that classified conversations are not inadvertently overheard outside these facilities. (Note: The acoustic protection of these secure areas is not intended to protect against deliberate audio technical surveillance.) Given these conditions, the ability of SCIFs and SAPFs structures to retain sound within their corresponding perimeters should be verified by performing objective and standardized sound attenuation tests. Alternatively, some US government agencies have approved non-instrumented acoustic security testing. However, this type of testing is not recommended because of the subjective nature of non-instrumented testing. Several single rating types that may be objectively and scientifically obtained for a given facility are listed below:

Apparent Sound Transmission Class (ASTC):

A single-number rating obtained by applying the classification procedure of ASTM Classification E413 to apparent transmission loss (ATL) data.

Field Sound Transmission Class (FSTC):

A single-number rating of sound transmission class calculated in accordance with ASTM Classification E413 using values of field transmission loss (FTL).

Noise Isolation Class (NIC):

A single-number rating calculated in accordance with ASTM Classification E413 using measured values of noise reduction (NR).

Normalized Noise Isolation Class (NNIC):

A single-number rating calculated in accordance with ASTM Classification E413 using measured values of normalized noise reduction (NNR).

Sound Transmission Class (STC):

A single-number rating calculated in accordance with ASTM Classification E413 using values of sound transmission loss. It provides an estimate of the performance of a partition in certain common sound insulation problems. Also: A single-number rating used to express the performance of a material to attenuate airborne acoustical energy.

Speech Privacy Class (SPC):

An objective rating of the speech privacy provided by a closed room, calculated as a sum of factors related to sound isolation provided by the room, and background noise at the receiving point.

Area/Conveyance Modification TSCM Inspection:

This type of inspection is usually carried out as a follow-up to a TSCM survey when modifications or repairs have been made to an area or conveyance. Any modification or repair to an area or conveyance designated as an Accredited Facility or a Private Secure Area may pose a technical surveillance threat, technical hazard threat or technical vulnerability threat. For this reason, TSCM support should be requested when modifications or repairs are contemplated so that proper coordination is made to ensure that TSCM personnel are onsite during the modifications or repairs, or alternatively, a TSCM inspection is conducted as soon as the modifications or repairs are completed. In any event, a TSCM inspection should be conducted for the area or conveyance BEFORE classified, sensitive or private information is discussed, viewed, stored or processed.

Equipment/Furniture Inspection:

An inspection of electronic equipment, electronic system, furniture or item to determine the presence of technical surveillance devices, technical hazards, technical vulnerabilities, design weaknesses or component failures. This type of TSCM inspection should be performed prior the introduction of any equipment, system, furniture or item into an area or conveyance where classified, sensitive or private information discussed, viewed or processed. Any item (equipment or furniture) that is introduced into an Accredited Facility or a Private Secure Area may pose a technical surveillance threat, technical hazard threat or technical vulnerability threat. Therefore, new items should be inspected prior to being introduced into such areas or conveyances.

Gift Inspection:

A physical, visual and fully instrumented electronic inspection of a gift to determine the presence of technical surveillance devices, technical hazards or technical vulnerabilities. Any gift provided to the recipient organization is a potential technical surveillance threat. This threat may be intentional or unintentional and must be determined prior to the introduction of the gift into a location (office, residence or conveyance) where classified, sensitive or private information discussed, viewed or processed. An effective and classic example of a technical surveillance attack carried out via a gift is the “Great Seal” bug given to the United States by the Soviet Union.

For more information on the “Great Seal” technical surveillance attack please see:

http://www.nsa.gov/about/cryptologic_heritage/museum/virtual_tour/museum_tour_text.shtml#great_seal

Domestic Gifts:

Gifts that are given by U.S. businesses, educational entities, private organizations, or individuals, including individuals acting in their personal capacities.

Foreign Government Gifts:

Gifts that are given by a unit of a foreign governmental authority, including any foreign national, state, local, and municipal government; any international or multinational organization whose membership is composed of any unit of foreign government; and any agent or representative of any such unit or organization while acting as such.

Foreign Non-Government Gifts:

Gifts that are given by foreign businesses, educational entities, private organizations, or individuals, including individuals acting in their personal capacities.

Whether the gift is a domestic gift or foreign gift, all gifts should be inspected prior to being introduced into an area or conveyance where classified, sensitive or private information is to be discussed, viewed or processed.

Pre-Accreditation TSCM Inspection:

A TSCM inspection of an area or conveyance that has not yet been accredited as a SCIF, SAPF or Secure Facility. (While these areas or conveyances are not typically fully furnished or fully equipped, pre-accreditation TSCM inspections can also be conducted if the areas or conveyances are fully furnished and equipped.) Regardless of whether the areas or conveyances are fully equipped, if these are to be accredited as SCIFs, SAPFs or Secure Facilities they must meet the applicable published physical and technical security specifications. However, experience has shown that few SCIFs, SAPFs or Secure Facilities are actually constructed in accordance with published specifications. As such, pre-accreditation TSCM inspections of these areas are highly recommended not only to verify that the published specifications have been met but also to detect the presence of technical surveillance devices, identify technical hazards, and identify technical vulnerabilities. When conducted with a pre-construction advice and assistance service, a pre-accreditation TSCM inspection is one of the most valuable TSCM services available. If used in conjunction, these services can save an organization considerable expense and prevent costly delays. Not only will the organization be guaranteed that their new facility will be accredited, but any possible security threat will also be identified for resolution. If security vulnerabilities or items of security interest are identified during the pre-accreditation, a follow up pre-accreditation TSCM inspection is usually be conducted. TSCM professionals will work closely with the organization security officer and building contractor to identify possible solutions to the resolve security vulnerabilities. And once a way forward is agreed upon and repairs are made, the follow-up pre-accreditation inspection will be conducted to inspect previously identified items. Some organizations even request that the TSCM team be present when the Accrediting Officials conduct their final accreditation inspection.

TSCM Threat Briefing:

A briefing that presents a broad overview of the TSCM profession and the threats it is designed to counter. TSCM threat briefings sometimes incorporate the demonstration of state-of-the-art TSCM examination equipment and also technical surveillance devices and equipment. This TSCM service can and should be incorporated into any organization’s security awareness briefings. A good rule of thumb is for this briefing to be given new employees during In-Processing and additionally provided on an annual basis. Specifically tailored threat briefings can be provided. For example, the technical espionage threat that modern portable electronic devices (PEDs) pose to an organizations’ classified, sensitive or private information is powerful threat briefing. In any event, the scope of the threat briefings can be tailored to an organization’s individual requirements.

No comments.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

plugin by phploaded.com